Blackberry Print

Blackberry Print

Sally Caulwell

Irish Blackberry bramble print, graphic block colour print of wild Irish plants, gifts for the home, Simple affordable Irish art data-zoom=

€28.00

€28.00

The blackberry or bramble, with its dark, juicy berries has been considered a valuable food source since the earliest times. Despite the nuisance of its thorny branches, it is traditionally valued for its use as a dye, for wickerwork and for curing skin complaints. 

Blackberries should not be eaten after the feast of Samhain (31st of October). In Irish folklore, it is believed the Púca* spat on the berries and made them inedible. The more practical reason is the berries begin to rot around this time of year. The Púca story is much more believable though!

*A Púca is a Halloween fairy or ghost believed to bring either good or bad fortune. The Púca can have dark or staunch white fur or hair. The creatures were said to be shape changers which could take the appearance of horses, goats, cats, dogs, and hares. They may also take a human form, which includes various animal features, such as ears or a tail.

One of a series of botanical illustrations inspired by Ireland's beautiful native hedgerows by Sally Caulwell. Other prints in the series include; Gorse, Blackthorn, & Wild Garlic. The above information on the blackberry was attained from Niall Mac Coitir's wonderful book Irish Wild Plants. 

Dimensions: A4 (210 x 297mm) print on 340gsm uncoated paper. Print inset with white border. This print suits this handmade frame by Rocker Lane Workshop perfectly.

The blackberry or bramble, with its dark, juicy berries has been considered a valuable food source since the earliest times. Despite the nuisance of its thorny branches, it is traditionally valued for its use as a dye, for wickerwork and for curing skin complaints. 

Blackberries should not be eaten after the feast of Samhain (31st of October). In Irish folklore, it is believed the Púca* spat on the berries and made them inedible. The more practical reason is the berries begin to rot around this time of year. The Púca story is much more believable though!

*A Púca is a Halloween fairy or ghost believed to bring either good or bad fortune. The Púca can have dark or staunch white fur or hair. The creatures were said to be shape changers which could take the appearance of horses, goats, cats, dogs, and hares. They may also take a human form, which includes various animal features, such as ears or a tail.

One of a series of botanical illustrations inspired by Ireland's beautiful native hedgerows by Sally Caulwell. Other prints in the series include; Gorse, Blackthorn, & Wild Garlic. The above information on the blackberry was attained from Niall Mac Coitir's wonderful book Irish Wild Plants. 

Dimensions: A4 (210 x 297mm) print on 340gsm uncoated paper. Print inset with white border. This print suits this handmade frame by Rocker Lane Workshop perfectly.

Our Story

Clare Grennan and Laura Caffrey established Irish Design Shop in 2008. A love of Irish craft and good design led these two jewellers to set up a retail space which offered customers both. Irish craft was witnessing a revival at this time, with a new breed of Irish designer/maker producing exciting, design-led products which embraced traditional and new techniques.

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Our Story

Clare Grennan and Laura Caffrey established Irish Design Shop in 2008. A love of Irish craft and good design led these two jewellers to set up a retail space which offered customers both. Irish craft was witnessing a revival at this time, with a new breed of Irish designer/maker producing exciting, design-led products which embraced traditional and new techniques.

Read More

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