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dublin

Stories


dublin

Tinnock Farm Candles

Tinnock Farm Candles

  Posted by Hannah Gumbrielle in: candle, candlemaking, Christmas gift, dublin

Handmade in small batches in the Sileveardagh Hills in Tipperary, we're big fans of the beautifully scented candles Tinnock Farm creates using 100% soy wax, cotton wicks, and a range of all-natural oils. Each are hand-poured, vegan and have a burn time of roughly 75 hours, as well as being free from paraffin, palm oil and dyes.

Tinnock Farm put an emphasis on sustainability within both their craft as well as their day to day lifestyle. They use no unnecessary packaging, and their small-holding includes an area of hazel coppice, vegetable gardens, a young orchard, streams and paddocks. They aim to be fully self-sufficient, growing much of their own food and reducing waste where possible. Tinnock is also a habitat to a range of native Irish flora and fauna including long-eared bats, red squirrels, pine martins, primroses, bluebells and cowslips to name just a few.

We always have a Tinnock Farm candle burning in our Drury Street, especially their festive Winter Spice to keep us cosy during cold winter days! We asked Kristen Ivors from Tinnock a few questions to learn more about their craft, their process and what inspires them day today. You can check out more of their handmade candles here

Tell us a bit about what you make.

I make soy wax candles and cold process soap with a focus on quality and simplicity, as well as being zero waste and free from plastic. 

Could you describe your studio to us? What is your favourite thing about the space?

I work from an old stable attached to our farmhouse. I love that everything is at my fingertips, I can see across the yard and have lots of room to work! My husband made me a concrete work bench which is the perfect surface for candle making, and all of my work happens on top of that. 

How do you get into the mindset of making?

I love walking into my studio in the morning with a cup of coffee, putting on some music, and starting my work. My dog Woody is my studio companion and he always at my feet while I am mixing or boxing up orders!

What is your favourite tool and why?

My favourite tool is an old jam thermometer that is just great at giving temperatures and stirring wax!

Can you describe your making process to us?

Candle and soap making is all about numbers, temperatures, and a lot of gentle stirring! To start a batch of candles, I melt soy wax flakes in a large boiler and add a touch of coconut wax. After heating the waxes, I mix and stir in my scents, either essential oils, or a combination or essential and fragrance oils, until they are fully incorporated before pouring into jars. When the candles have set, I lid and label them, and they are cured for a few weeks.

What is your inspiration?

Our farm, nature and my gardens as well as the peace that surrounds me everyday. I would love to give everyone a bit of that feeling of calmness when they are lighting their candle!

What led you to choose this craft as a profession? What do you love most about it?

I have always made my own candles and the business grew after some people wanted to buy them. I love how much freedom this craft gives. I spend half of my day making candles and soap, and the other half in the vegetable garden, chopping wood, or checking up on our animals. It gives me the time to be able to run a business but also further our goal of becoming self sufficient. 

What is your favourite candle you've created? 

My favourite scent changes with the seasons and moods, but you really can’t beat a good lavender candle!

 We stock a range of Tinnock Farms handmade candles both in store and online.

Tinnock Farm Candles

Tinnock Farm Candles

  Posted by Hannah Gumbrielle in: candle, candlemaking, Christmas gift, dublin

Handmade in small batches in the Sileveardagh Hills in Tipperary, we're big fans of the beautifully scented candles Tinnock Farm creates using 100% soy wax, cotton wicks, and a range of all-natural oils. Each are hand-poured, vegan and have a burn time of roughly 75 hours, as well as being free from paraffin, palm oil and dyes.

Tinnock Farm put an emphasis on sustainability within both their craft as well as their day to day lifestyle. They use no unnecessary packaging, and their small-holding includes an area of hazel coppice, vegetable gardens, a young orchard, streams and paddocks. They aim to be fully self-sufficient, growing much of their own food and reducing waste where possible. Tinnock is also a habitat to a range of native Irish flora and fauna including long-eared bats, red squirrels, pine martins, primroses, bluebells and cowslips to name just a few.

We always have a Tinnock Farm candle burning in our Drury Street, especially their festive Winter Spice to keep us cosy during cold winter days! We asked Kristen Ivors from Tinnock a few questions to learn more about their craft, their process and what inspires them day today. You can check out more of their handmade candles here

Tell us a bit about what you make.

I make soy wax candles and cold process soap with a focus on quality and simplicity, as well as being zero waste and free from plastic. 

Could you describe your studio to us? What is your favourite thing about the space?

I work from an old stable attached to our farmhouse. I love that everything is at my fingertips, I can see across the yard and have lots of room to work! My husband made me a concrete work bench which is the perfect surface for candle making, and all of my work happens on top of that. 

How do you get into the mindset of making?

I love walking into my studio in the morning with a cup of coffee, putting on some music, and starting my work. My dog Woody is my studio companion and he always at my feet while I am mixing or boxing up orders!

What is your favourite tool and why?

My favourite tool is an old jam thermometer that is just great at giving temperatures and stirring wax!

Can you describe your making process to us?

Candle and soap making is all about numbers, temperatures, and a lot of gentle stirring! To start a batch of candles, I melt soy wax flakes in a large boiler and add a touch of coconut wax. After heating the waxes, I mix and stir in my scents, either essential oils, or a combination or essential and fragrance oils, until they are fully incorporated before pouring into jars. When the candles have set, I lid and label them, and they are cured for a few weeks.

What is your inspiration?

Our farm, nature and my gardens as well as the peace that surrounds me everyday. I would love to give everyone a bit of that feeling of calmness when they are lighting their candle!

What led you to choose this craft as a profession? What do you love most about it?

I have always made my own candles and the business grew after some people wanted to buy them. I love how much freedom this craft gives. I spend half of my day making candles and soap, and the other half in the vegetable garden, chopping wood, or checking up on our animals. It gives me the time to be able to run a business but also further our goal of becoming self sufficient. 

What is your favourite candle you've created? 

My favourite scent changes with the seasons and moods, but you really can’t beat a good lavender candle!

 We stock a range of Tinnock Farms handmade candles both in store and online.

Laura Caffrey - Names Dublin

Laura Caffrey - Names Dublin

  Posted by Clare Grennan in: Drury Street, Dublin, Dublin workshop, Irish design shop

  • What do you make?

I make jewellery. For the past two years, along with my partner in crime Clare, I have been producing a range of jewellery, Names, that we believe reflects both of our skills and personalities in equal measures. We have designed two collections so far, with another micro collection in the pipelines at the moment.

  • Could you tell us a little bit about your studio? Favourite thing about the space and how do you get into the mindset of making?

Our studio is just above Irish Design Shop, so we share our time between the shop and the studio. Sometimes it can be difficult to change over from shop mindset to studio mindset, tidying up the workbench is always a good starting point, and we always have a to-do list on the go to refer to. It’s a great space with really good light and a great view of all of the comings and goings on a bustling Drury Street. We share the space with six other jewellers so there’s always someone around to chat to.

  • What is your favourite tool and why?

I have quite a few favourite go-to tools, one file that I prefer to all of the others, a nice new calipers that’s great for measuring and marking, but my mini rawhide mallet is probably my favourite. It’s made of rolled up animal hide, so you can use it to shape metal without marking it like you would with a metal hammer, but this one has a little weight inside it, so it gives an extra bit of power behind it, it’s small but mighty!

  • Can you describe the making process and inspiration behind your Muriel bangle?

The Muriel bangle is one of my favourite pieces from our second collection ‘Homespun’. It kind of brings together a lot of the ideas in the two collections. The combination of the solid and hollow forms sit really nicely side by side or apart, and move freely around the solid round bangle.

The two moving components were originally formed in wax on the lathe and then cast in solid silver, the casts are cleaned up before being threaded onto the round wire which has been shaped into a round bangle. The bangle is then soldered closed and the whole piece sanded and polished to show off our trademark contrasting matte and polished finishes. The work is all very hands on and the designs are heavily influenced by traditional jewellery skills, used in a way to produce modern, contemporary shapes.

  • What led you to choosing this craft as a profession? What do you love most about it?

I started in art college full sure that I would be studying either painting or possibly textiles. In first year we had to try out a few courses and for some reason, I tried out metalwork, that one week trial totally changed my mind. I was fascinated by the things you could do with metal, how something so solid can be so malleable. I love that with metal, most things are repairable. With ceramics and glass, if it breaks you cannot really fix it, with metal you can almost always fix whatever goes wrong.

For a better look at Laura and Clare's stunning jewellery collection "Names" you can shop or simply have a browse here.

Laura Caffrey - Names Dublin

Laura Caffrey - Names Dublin

  Posted by Clare Grennan in: Drury Street, Dublin, Dublin workshop, Irish design shop

  • What do you make?

I make jewellery. For the past two years, along with my partner in crime Clare, I have been producing a range of jewellery, Names, that we believe reflects both of our skills and personalities in equal measures. We have designed two collections so far, with another micro collection in the pipelines at the moment.

  • Could you tell us a little bit about your studio? Favourite thing about the space and how do you get into the mindset of making?

Our studio is just above Irish Design Shop, so we share our time between the shop and the studio. Sometimes it can be difficult to change over from shop mindset to studio mindset, tidying up the workbench is always a good starting point, and we always have a to-do list on the go to refer to. It’s a great space with really good light and a great view of all of the comings and goings on a bustling Drury Street. We share the space with six other jewellers so there’s always someone around to chat to.

  • What is your favourite tool and why?

I have quite a few favourite go-to tools, one file that I prefer to all of the others, a nice new calipers that’s great for measuring and marking, but my mini rawhide mallet is probably my favourite. It’s made of rolled up animal hide, so you can use it to shape metal without marking it like you would with a metal hammer, but this one has a little weight inside it, so it gives an extra bit of power behind it, it’s small but mighty!

  • Can you describe the making process and inspiration behind your Muriel bangle?

The Muriel bangle is one of my favourite pieces from our second collection ‘Homespun’. It kind of brings together a lot of the ideas in the two collections. The combination of the solid and hollow forms sit really nicely side by side or apart, and move freely around the solid round bangle.

The two moving components were originally formed in wax on the lathe and then cast in solid silver, the casts are cleaned up before being threaded onto the round wire which has been shaped into a round bangle. The bangle is then soldered closed and the whole piece sanded and polished to show off our trademark contrasting matte and polished finishes. The work is all very hands on and the designs are heavily influenced by traditional jewellery skills, used in a way to produce modern, contemporary shapes.

  • What led you to choosing this craft as a profession? What do you love most about it?

I started in art college full sure that I would be studying either painting or possibly textiles. In first year we had to try out a few courses and for some reason, I tried out metalwork, that one week trial totally changed my mind. I was fascinated by the things you could do with metal, how something so solid can be so malleable. I love that with metal, most things are repairable. With ceramics and glass, if it breaks you cannot really fix it, with metal you can almost always fix whatever goes wrong.

For a better look at Laura and Clare's stunning jewellery collection "Names" you can shop or simply have a browse here.

A starry eyed Alex

A starry eyed Alex

  Posted by Laura Caffrey in: 2016 Calendar, Alex Synge, Astrology, Christmas gift

Three years ago we had a chat with our good friend Alex Synge about the idea of producing an annual wall calendar for Irish Design Shop. After a bit of playing around with what we might do we shelved the idea until last year when we produced our first calendar with The Project Twins. This 2015 calendar was so popular, that we decided to make it an annual project, and enlist the talents of a leading Irish designer, illustrator or artist to come up with the artwork and theme. 

So finally, this January we sat down with Alex again and started to plan a calendar for 2016, and we think it has been worth the wait. The concept behind this Calendar of Constellations was all Alex's idea. His amateur interest in the night sky has turned into a project which reaches far beyond any of our expectations.

The calendar comprises 13 beautiful lithographic prints of the constellations. Printed one colour, silver ink on black stock, each month includes informative descriptions of what might be on view in the night skies above Ireland at that time. These 300mm square prints are perforated to be kept long after the month has passed. We have enlisted our framer Conor to create a bespoke limed ash frame to fit the perforated images perfectly. Also, a limited edition tote bag has been produced which will be available to purchase along with the calendar and handmade frames from Thursday November 5th. 

 

 

A starry eyed Alex

A starry eyed Alex

  Posted by Laura Caffrey in: 2016 Calendar, Alex Synge, Astrology, Christmas gift

Three years ago we had a chat with our good friend Alex Synge about the idea of producing an annual wall calendar for Irish Design Shop. After a bit of playing around with what we might do we shelved the idea until last year when we produced our first calendar with The Project Twins. This 2015 calendar was so popular, that we decided to make it an annual project, and enlist the talents of a leading Irish designer, illustrator or artist to come up with the artwork and theme. 

So finally, this January we sat down with Alex again and started to plan a calendar for 2016, and we think it has been worth the wait. The concept behind this Calendar of Constellations was all Alex's idea. His amateur interest in the night sky has turned into a project which reaches far beyond any of our expectations.

The calendar comprises 13 beautiful lithographic prints of the constellations. Printed one colour, silver ink on black stock, each month includes informative descriptions of what might be on view in the night skies above Ireland at that time. These 300mm square prints are perforated to be kept long after the month has passed. We have enlisted our framer Conor to create a bespoke limed ash frame to fit the perforated images perfectly. Also, a limited edition tote bag has been produced which will be available to purchase along with the calendar and handmade frames from Thursday November 5th. 

 

 

Al Higgins Photography

Al Higgins Photography

  Posted by Laura Caffrey in: al higgins, design, dublin, irish

A couple of weeks ago we packed up half of the shop and dragged it across the river to Al Higgin's studio, to photograph our newest products as well as this year's Christmas offerings, which we'll keep to ourselves for now!

  

This was our first photo shoot with Al, having been recommended to us by our last photographer Philip White. We had seen some of his work before, including the beautiful shots he took for Bean and Goose chocolate, and Teeling Whiskey as well as his portrait of the guys in Designgoat.  Clare spent the morning with Al, arranging these beautiful displays and drinking strong coffee. We are so happy with how they turned out we wanted to share them with you.

You can see more of Al's work on his website or his instagram page

 

Al Higgins Photography

Al Higgins Photography

  Posted by Laura Caffrey in: al higgins, design, dublin, irish

A couple of weeks ago we packed up half of the shop and dragged it across the river to Al Higgin's studio, to photograph our newest products as well as this year's Christmas offerings, which we'll keep to ourselves for now!

  

This was our first photo shoot with Al, having been recommended to us by our last photographer Philip White. We had seen some of his work before, including the beautiful shots he took for Bean and Goose chocolate, and Teeling Whiskey as well as his portrait of the guys in Designgoat.  Clare spent the morning with Al, arranging these beautiful displays and drinking strong coffee. We are so happy with how they turned out we wanted to share them with you.

You can see more of Al's work on his website or his instagram page

 

A haunted dwelling on Aungier Street

A haunted dwelling on Aungier Street

  Posted by Clare Grennan in: Aungier Street, Dublin, Haunted Dublin, Medieval Dublin

Our ghostly tale takes place on one of Dublin’s oldest streets, in one of the great houses which date back to the 17th century. The much over-looked, modern day Aungier street with its assortment of cafes, shops, bars and offices disguises a rich medieval past, hidden beneath contemporary shop fronts and facades. Conservation works are quietly taking place above ground floor units, restoring and protecting these great houses. 9/9a Aungier street, which houses a jewellers and estate agent on its ground floor is of immeasurable importance, being Dublin’s oldest residential building.

Concealed behind an inconspicuous blue door, a rickety staircase leads to the upper levels, where the layers of time are slowly being stripped back to reveal the very bones of this magnificent house. Faded wallpaper of various designs, one pasted over another, floor markings from past partitions & tiny nail holes in the walls from where pictures hung, speak of the former residents of this 350 year old atmospheric building. It was while researching the past occupants, that I came across a tale of haunted happenings and strange disturbances in an Aungier street mansion from the year 1853.

Two medical students by the names of Tom and Richard took up abode in the untenanted 9/9a Aungier street* which served as the perfect residence while completing their studies. It was not long before both began experiencing uneasy nights and disturbed sleep in the scantily furnished residence. Every second night, Richard awoke from frightening visions of an abominable figure which would move from the window towards the foot of his bed. Attempts to dispel these visions by way of a tonic before nightfall proved unsuccessful, and it was not long before Richard discovered Tom was experiencing equally uneasy nights.

One night, for a wonder, I was sleeping soundly, when I was roused by a step on the lobby outside my room, followed by the loud clang of what turned out to be a large brass candlestick, flung with all his force by poor Tom Ludlow over the banisters, and rattling with a rebound down the second flight of stairs; and almost concurrently with this, Tom burst open my door, and bounced into my room backwards, in a state of extraordinary agitation.

Overcome with anxiety and fear, poor Tom was unable to speak of the hideous vision which so unmanned him. The following morning, Tom had made the decision to visit his father while Richard sought alternative accommodation, both concluding moving out of the haunted dwelling was necessary.

A week elapsed before alternative quarters were secured on Digges street, in which time poor Richard was haunted by nightly occurrences of heavy footsteps descending the medieval staircase from the gloomy loft. Thankful of Tom’s return, Richard relayed his week of fearful nights over breakfast in the mansion before moving their belongings to their new residence.

Having recovered from his own night of horror in the Aungier street house, Tom decided to disclose the details of his vision to his good friend:

Without a start or fearful sensation of any kind, I waked gently, but completely. It was, as you have good reason to remember, long past midnight--I believe, about two o'clock. When sleep has been deep and long enough to satisfy nature thoroughly, one often wakens in this way, suddenly, tranquilly, and completely.

 "There was a figure seated in that lumbering, old sofa-chair, near the fireplace. Its back was rather towards me, but I could not be mistaken; it turned slowly round, and, merciful heavens! there was the stony face, with its infernal lineaments of malignity and despair, gloating on me. There was now no doubt as to its consciousness of my presence, and the hellish malice with which it was animated, for it arose, and drew close to the bedside. There was a rope about its neck, and the other end, coiled up, it held stiffly in its hand.

"My good angel nerved me for this horrible crisis. I remained for some seconds transfixed by the gaze of this tremendous phantom. He came close to the bed, and appeared on the point of mounting upon it. The next instant I was upon the floor at the far side, and in a moment more was, I don't know how, upon the lobby.

 "But the spell was not yet broken; the valley of the shadow of death was not yet traversed. The abhorred phantom was before me there; it was standing near the banisters, stooping a little, and with one end of the rope round its own neck, was poising a noose at the other, as if to throw over mine; and while engaged in this baleful pantomime, it wore a smile so sensual, so unspeakably dreadful, that my senses were nearly overpowered. I saw and remember nothing more, until I found myself in your room.

"I had a wonderful escape, Dick--there is no disputing that--an escape for which, while I live, I shall bless the mercy of heaven. No one can conceive or imagine what it is for flesh and blood to stand in the presence of such a thing, but one who has had the terrific experience. Dick, Dick, a shadow has passed over me--a chill has crossed my blood and marrow, and I will never be the same again--never, Dick--never!"

The handmaid, a local woman, was present for Tom’s recollection, and by its conclusion was quite unnerved. "It's often I heard tell of it," she now said, "but I never believed it rightly till now” She relayed the story of a former dweller in the house, a man by the name of Judge Horrocks, infamous for sentencing numerous souls to death by hanging. This most unpopular, and hateful judge came to his own unpleasant end, in the very house in which they stood, and was found hanging from the banisters in the great stairwell some years earlier.

In this cold light of day, Tom and Richard packed the remainder of their belongings, relieved to be leaving the haunted residence, the cause of immeasurable fear and torment.

“And so, we all sallied out together, each of us breathing more freely, I have no doubt, as we crossed that ill-omened threshold for the last time.”

 

To read the full tale of the haunted residence on Aungier street,follow the link here.                                                                    *Although it is unconfirmed this ghostly tale occurred in 9/9a Aungier street, Nicola Matthews (Dublin Civic Trust) assures us it is most probably the location, as the character and layout of the interior relates to that of 9/9a.

Top image courtesy of the Irish Georgian Society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A haunted dwelling on Aungier Street

A haunted dwelling on Aungier Street

  Posted by Clare Grennan in: Aungier Street, Dublin, Haunted Dublin, Medieval Dublin

Our ghostly tale takes place on one of Dublin’s oldest streets, in one of the great houses which date back to the 17th century. The much over-looked, modern day Aungier street with its assortment of cafes, shops, bars and offices disguises a rich medieval past, hidden beneath contemporary shop fronts and facades. Conservation works are quietly taking place above ground floor units, restoring and protecting these great houses. 9/9a Aungier street, which houses a jewellers and estate agent on its ground floor is of immeasurable importance, being Dublin’s oldest residential building.

Concealed behind an inconspicuous blue door, a rickety staircase leads to the upper levels, where the layers of time are slowly being stripped back to reveal the very bones of this magnificent house. Faded wallpaper of various designs, one pasted over another, floor markings from past partitions & tiny nail holes in the walls from where pictures hung, speak of the former residents of this 350 year old atmospheric building. It was while researching the past occupants, that I came across a tale of haunted happenings and strange disturbances in an Aungier street mansion from the year 1853.

Two medical students by the names of Tom and Richard took up abode in the untenanted 9/9a Aungier street* which served as the perfect residence while completing their studies. It was not long before both began experiencing uneasy nights and disturbed sleep in the scantily furnished residence. Every second night, Richard awoke from frightening visions of an abominable figure which would move from the window towards the foot of his bed. Attempts to dispel these visions by way of a tonic before nightfall proved unsuccessful, and it was not long before Richard discovered Tom was experiencing equally uneasy nights.

One night, for a wonder, I was sleeping soundly, when I was roused by a step on the lobby outside my room, followed by the loud clang of what turned out to be a large brass candlestick, flung with all his force by poor Tom Ludlow over the banisters, and rattling with a rebound down the second flight of stairs; and almost concurrently with this, Tom burst open my door, and bounced into my room backwards, in a state of extraordinary agitation.

Overcome with anxiety and fear, poor Tom was unable to speak of the hideous vision which so unmanned him. The following morning, Tom had made the decision to visit his father while Richard sought alternative accommodation, both concluding moving out of the haunted dwelling was necessary.

A week elapsed before alternative quarters were secured on Digges street, in which time poor Richard was haunted by nightly occurrences of heavy footsteps descending the medieval staircase from the gloomy loft. Thankful of Tom’s return, Richard relayed his week of fearful nights over breakfast in the mansion before moving their belongings to their new residence.

Having recovered from his own night of horror in the Aungier street house, Tom decided to disclose the details of his vision to his good friend:

Without a start or fearful sensation of any kind, I waked gently, but completely. It was, as you have good reason to remember, long past midnight--I believe, about two o'clock. When sleep has been deep and long enough to satisfy nature thoroughly, one often wakens in this way, suddenly, tranquilly, and completely.

 "There was a figure seated in that lumbering, old sofa-chair, near the fireplace. Its back was rather towards me, but I could not be mistaken; it turned slowly round, and, merciful heavens! there was the stony face, with its infernal lineaments of malignity and despair, gloating on me. There was now no doubt as to its consciousness of my presence, and the hellish malice with which it was animated, for it arose, and drew close to the bedside. There was a rope about its neck, and the other end, coiled up, it held stiffly in its hand.

"My good angel nerved me for this horrible crisis. I remained for some seconds transfixed by the gaze of this tremendous phantom. He came close to the bed, and appeared on the point of mounting upon it. The next instant I was upon the floor at the far side, and in a moment more was, I don't know how, upon the lobby.

 "But the spell was not yet broken; the valley of the shadow of death was not yet traversed. The abhorred phantom was before me there; it was standing near the banisters, stooping a little, and with one end of the rope round its own neck, was poising a noose at the other, as if to throw over mine; and while engaged in this baleful pantomime, it wore a smile so sensual, so unspeakably dreadful, that my senses were nearly overpowered. I saw and remember nothing more, until I found myself in your room.

"I had a wonderful escape, Dick--there is no disputing that--an escape for which, while I live, I shall bless the mercy of heaven. No one can conceive or imagine what it is for flesh and blood to stand in the presence of such a thing, but one who has had the terrific experience. Dick, Dick, a shadow has passed over me--a chill has crossed my blood and marrow, and I will never be the same again--never, Dick--never!"

The handmaid, a local woman, was present for Tom’s recollection, and by its conclusion was quite unnerved. "It's often I heard tell of it," she now said, "but I never believed it rightly till now” She relayed the story of a former dweller in the house, a man by the name of Judge Horrocks, infamous for sentencing numerous souls to death by hanging. This most unpopular, and hateful judge came to his own unpleasant end, in the very house in which they stood, and was found hanging from the banisters in the great stairwell some years earlier.

In this cold light of day, Tom and Richard packed the remainder of their belongings, relieved to be leaving the haunted residence, the cause of immeasurable fear and torment.

“And so, we all sallied out together, each of us breathing more freely, I have no doubt, as we crossed that ill-omened threshold for the last time.”

 

To read the full tale of the haunted residence on Aungier street,follow the link here.                                                                    *Although it is unconfirmed this ghostly tale occurred in 9/9a Aungier street, Nicola Matthews (Dublin Civic Trust) assures us it is most probably the location, as the character and layout of the interior relates to that of 9/9a.

Top image courtesy of the Irish Georgian Society.