Stories

Stories

Adam Frew Ceramics

Adam Frew Ceramics

  Posted by Clare Grennan in: Adam Frew, interiors, irish design shop, porcelain

A few months back, we approached one of our favourite Irish ceramicists, Adam Frew about producing a tea pot for our shop. After much experimentation with shape, ease of hold and the all important pour, Adam decided upon this perfect tea pot, which is available in two hand drawn patterns. Wheel thrown in porcelain, each piece is individually made, resulting in each tea pot being unique.

For the month of August, we will be highlighting the work of this Portstewart based maker, with a selection of his larger pieces available to purchase in addition to the beautiful tea pots and complimentary lidded pots. Drop by our Drury Street shop to see the full selection. 

  

Adam Frew Ceramics

Adam Frew Ceramics

  Posted by Clare Grennan in: Adam Frew, interiors, irish design shop, porcelain

A few months back, we approached one of our favourite Irish ceramicists, Adam Frew about producing a tea pot for our shop. After much experimentation with shape, ease of hold and the all important pour, Adam decided upon this perfect tea pot, which is available in two hand drawn patterns. Wheel thrown in porcelain, each piece is individually made, resulting in each tea pot being unique.

For the month of August, we will be highlighting the work of this Portstewart based maker, with a selection of his larger pieces available to purchase in addition to the beautiful tea pots and complimentary lidded pots. Drop by our Drury Street shop to see the full selection. 

  

Cast your vote

Cast your vote

  Posted by Anne-Marie Neligan in: best shop, craft, design, gift

Irish Design Shop have been nominated again for The Irish Times 'Best Shops in Ireland, 2015.' We are delighted to be on the list with so many other great shops in Dublin and the rest of the country. There are ten categories to vote in, we are surrounded by such great independent shops and cafés here on Drury Street and the surrounding areas, it's tough to choose who we will vote for.

If you would like to vote for us as your favourite gifts/design/interiors shop, you can do so on The Irish Times website.

We are continuing our Summer Specials discounts this weekend, with 10% off all on-line purchases from the "Summer" section on the website. Just use the promo code VOTEIDS at the checkout. 

Cast your vote

Cast your vote

  Posted by Anne-Marie Neligan in: best shop, craft, design, gift

Irish Design Shop have been nominated again for The Irish Times 'Best Shops in Ireland, 2015.' We are delighted to be on the list with so many other great shops in Dublin and the rest of the country. There are ten categories to vote in, we are surrounded by such great independent shops and cafés here on Drury Street and the surrounding areas, it's tough to choose who we will vote for.

If you would like to vote for us as your favourite gifts/design/interiors shop, you can do so on The Irish Times website.

We are continuing our Summer Specials discounts this weekend, with 10% off all on-line purchases from the "Summer" section on the website. Just use the promo code VOTEIDS at the checkout. 

Summer Specials

Summer Specials

  Posted by Anne-Marie Neligan in: Ninetynine, Portmarnock, Summer

It's been a scorcher of a week here in Dublin (sorry to all of you in the West). The team here in Irish Design Shop have been making our best efforts to enjoy the summer sun... lunch breaks at Dubhlinn Garden, picnics in St. Patricks Park and taking off to one of Dublin's 5 Blue Flag Beaches in the evenings (Balcarrick, Killiney, Portmarnock, Portane, Seapoint). This week I made several visits to my local and favourite beach, Portmarnock.

Portmarnock beach, also known as The Velvet Strand, boasts 5km of white sandy beach with spectacular views of Lambay Island, Ireland's Eye and Howth Peninsula. Park at the Golf Links Road car park, follow the path over the sand dunes and you'll find you'll find yourself away from the crowds, in lesser trodden terrain. Finish the day off with a 99 from the ice-cream kiosk near Portmarnock's Martello Tower.

To celebrate the fine weather, we will be offering our customers a series of online promotions throughout the summer. This Saturday and Sunday customers can avail of 10% off all purchases from our SUMMER section by using the code 'Ninetynine' at the checkout.

Summer Specials

Summer Specials

  Posted by Anne-Marie Neligan in: Ninetynine, Portmarnock, Summer

It's been a scorcher of a week here in Dublin (sorry to all of you in the West). The team here in Irish Design Shop have been making our best efforts to enjoy the summer sun... lunch breaks at Dubhlinn Garden, picnics in St. Patricks Park and taking off to one of Dublin's 5 Blue Flag Beaches in the evenings (Balcarrick, Killiney, Portmarnock, Portane, Seapoint). This week I made several visits to my local and favourite beach, Portmarnock.

Portmarnock beach, also known as The Velvet Strand, boasts 5km of white sandy beach with spectacular views of Lambay Island, Ireland's Eye and Howth Peninsula. Park at the Golf Links Road car park, follow the path over the sand dunes and you'll find you'll find yourself away from the crowds, in lesser trodden terrain. Finish the day off with a 99 from the ice-cream kiosk near Portmarnock's Martello Tower.

To celebrate the fine weather, we will be offering our customers a series of online promotions throughout the summer. This Saturday and Sunday customers can avail of 10% off all purchases from our SUMMER section by using the code 'Ninetynine' at the checkout.

Summer Solstice

Summer Solstice

  Posted by Clare Grennan in: Healing plants, Irish Folklore, Midsummer, Solstice

The Summer Solstice marks the longest day of the year, and the shortest night. Celebrated in the Northern hemisphere on June 21st, the word solstice comes from the Latin solstitium, from sol (sun) and stitium (to stop), reflecting the fact that the Sun appears to stop at this time. Originally a significant Pagan celebration with ancient shrines like Newgrange and Stonehenge built to align with the solstice, June 21st was later adopted by Christianity to celebrate the birth of John the Baptist. Traditions differ and vary between countries of the Northern hemisphere celebrating the longest day. In Pagan Ireland, people believed that certain plants had miraculous healing powers and they, therefore, picked them on this night. Bonfires were lit to protect against evil spirits which were believed to roam freely when the sun was turning southwards again. In pockets of rural Ireland solstice is still marked by the lighting of bonfires on beaches, promontories and hilltops. 

Mugwort (Mongach Meisce):                                                                                                                                           Mugwort was traditionally believed to have strong powers of protection over evil. It was known in Europe as the Mother of Herbs, and has strong associations with Solstice and St. Johns Eve. Its powers were strengthened by smoking it over the bonfires which were lit to mark the festival. Wreaths and garlands of the smoked mugwort were hung over doors and windows to keep away all evil powers. If you are interested in finding out more about the folklore, myths and legends of Irish wild plants, Niall Mac Coitir's book on the subject is a must read! It is available through our online shop and in our Drury street shop. 

 

Summer Solstice

Summer Solstice

  Posted by Clare Grennan in: Healing plants, Irish Folklore, Midsummer, Solstice

The Summer Solstice marks the longest day of the year, and the shortest night. Celebrated in the Northern hemisphere on June 21st, the word solstice comes from the Latin solstitium, from sol (sun) and stitium (to stop), reflecting the fact that the Sun appears to stop at this time. Originally a significant Pagan celebration with ancient shrines like Newgrange and Stonehenge built to align with the solstice, June 21st was later adopted by Christianity to celebrate the birth of John the Baptist. Traditions differ and vary between countries of the Northern hemisphere celebrating the longest day. In Pagan Ireland, people believed that certain plants had miraculous healing powers and they, therefore, picked them on this night. Bonfires were lit to protect against evil spirits which were believed to roam freely when the sun was turning southwards again. In pockets of rural Ireland solstice is still marked by the lighting of bonfires on beaches, promontories and hilltops. 

Mugwort (Mongach Meisce):                                                                                                                                           Mugwort was traditionally believed to have strong powers of protection over evil. It was known in Europe as the Mother of Herbs, and has strong associations with Solstice and St. Johns Eve. Its powers were strengthened by smoking it over the bonfires which were lit to mark the festival. Wreaths and garlands of the smoked mugwort were hung over doors and windows to keep away all evil powers. If you are interested in finding out more about the folklore, myths and legends of Irish wild plants, Niall Mac Coitir's book on the subject is a must read! It is available through our online shop and in our Drury street shop. 

 

Print Block Makes

Print Block Makes

  Posted by Clare Grennan in: collective, Dublin, Print Block, Print Block makes

Print Block is a collective of print makers based on Dublin's Cork street. Established in 2010, their aim is to raise the profile of printed textile design, develop the industry, and increase the reputation for Irish designed and printed textiles. This dynamic collective is releasing it's first signature range of hand screen-printed wool scarves under the brand name Print Block Makes. This collection presents a simple graphic style that showcases the fundamentals of textile print at its best. The fabric is a lightweight soft pure wool printed in a choice of vivid colours. Five unique designs are available by the following creatives, Aoife Challis; Ruth Doorley; Jennifer Phelan; Caroline Ryan; and Olga Tiernan. Each design is a limited edition of 50, and is hand printed and hand finished in their Dublin studio. 

Print Block Makes will be available for sale from the 18th June at Irish Design Shop on Drury Street, Dublin 2. A launch event will be held on 17th June from 6.00 to 8.00pm, which is kindly sponsored by Jameson.  This event also celebrates our beautiful new shopfront, which was designed with Steven McNamara, and constructed by Philip Murray. We hope many of our lovely customers can join us, all are welcome. 

Print Block Makes

Print Block Makes

  Posted by Clare Grennan in: collective, Dublin, Print Block, Print Block makes

Print Block is a collective of print makers based on Dublin's Cork street. Established in 2010, their aim is to raise the profile of printed textile design, develop the industry, and increase the reputation for Irish designed and printed textiles. This dynamic collective is releasing it's first signature range of hand screen-printed wool scarves under the brand name Print Block Makes. This collection presents a simple graphic style that showcases the fundamentals of textile print at its best. The fabric is a lightweight soft pure wool printed in a choice of vivid colours. Five unique designs are available by the following creatives, Aoife Challis; Ruth Doorley; Jennifer Phelan; Caroline Ryan; and Olga Tiernan. Each design is a limited edition of 50, and is hand printed and hand finished in their Dublin studio. 

Print Block Makes will be available for sale from the 18th June at Irish Design Shop on Drury Street, Dublin 2. A launch event will be held on 17th June from 6.00 to 8.00pm, which is kindly sponsored by Jameson.  This event also celebrates our beautiful new shopfront, which was designed with Steven McNamara, and constructed by Philip Murray. We hope many of our lovely customers can join us, all are welcome.